Accession Number: NEKHC:2014.7.1

Object: Envelope

Category: Westerbork; The Netherlands; The Nazi Regime; The Nazi Camp System; Jopie Vedder

Physical Description: Paper envelope; fading pencil handwritten; ink stamp; postage stamp affixed to corner; tearing down sides; fragile.

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This envelope is one of six documents donated together. The documents contain a letter written by a Jewish man held in Westerbork Transit Camp, to his non-Jewish partner in Amsterdam, and letters to her from his relative.

Further Information

This envelope is addressed to Jopie Vedder, at an Amsterdam address. The envelope is one of six documents donated together. The documents include letters written to Jopie by a relative of her partner, and a letter to Jopie from Westerbork Transit Camp written by her partner, who was a Jewish man from Amsterdam. The pair had been living together in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation of The Netherlands. Jopie was not Jewish, however her partner was, and he was arrested by the Nazi regime and held in Westerbork. The circumstances of his death are not known, however he did not survive the Holocaust. The donor’s mother had been friends with Jopie since becoming a lodger in her boarding house at the end of the Second World War. The pair remained good friends and Jopie travelled with the family to Zambia for a time, before returning to Holland. Jopie was around twenty years older than the donor’s mother, she never married or took another partner.